New York, NY (LaGuardia) – OEP:KLGA

IMPACT: NextGen-Noise
8-15-2015 KLGA
LAGUARDIA AIRPORT
(680 acres) New York, NY

Four Nearby Instrument Airports:
[KJRA] 6 W ; [KJFK] 9 SE ; [KTEB] 10 NW ;
[KEWR] 14 W ;
(ave. distance: 10 nm)
Total Based Aircraft:0
Operations & ATC:
(est. 1,014 ops/day (98% commercial)
24hr FAA towerFAA staffing as of 9/20/14:36
FAA’s ATADS data shows Peak Year was 2006. Total airport operations in 2014 were DOWN 9% from the peak year.
Click on this button for links to background info: [KLGA]-REFERENCE
Additional buttons:NextGen-Noisesearch (aiR)OEP-35
AIRNAV Form 5010 WIKIMETAR NOAA (weather)
FlightAware.comFlightStats.comFlightRadar24.com

LGA ATADS data, 1991-2014:

Year Commercial Ops % Commercial TOTAL OPS Change from Peak Year
1991 311,213 94% 329,571 -19%
1992 319,094 95% 335,898 -17%
1993 320,762 95% 337,674 -17%
1994 319,216 95% 337,787 -17%
1995 326,276 94% 345,512 -15%
1996 324,672 94% 344,776 -15%
1997 335,398 95% 354,482 -13%
1998 341,199 95% 360,858 -11%
1999 348,523 95% 368,311 -9%
2000 375,551 96% 392,047 -3%
2001 368,326 98% 376,919 -7%
2002 356,376 97% 367,656 -9%
2003 366,775 97% 379,369 -7%
2004 393,898 97% 405,598 0%
2005 394,154 97% 405,513 0%
2006 394,850 97% 406,211 PEAK YEAR
2007 386,788 97% 397,280 -2%
2008 375,057 98% 384,080 -5%
2009 350,032 98% 357,177 -12%
2010 360,081 98% 367,346 -10%
2011 364,140 98% 370,690 -9%
2012 367,212 98% 374,253 -8%
2013 368,309 98% 375,420 -8%
2014 363,109 98% 370,012 -9%
2015 361,759 98% 368,362 -9%

Aeronautical chart from VFRmap.com. (Click to open in a new window).

Scrollable aerial view at bing.com. (Click to open in a new window).


Airport Narrative (Overview & History)

This airport opened for commercial service in 1939, five years after New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia landed at Newark and refused to disembark, because his ticket said ‘New York’. His act of civil disobedience worked, as he was then flown to Bennett Field and initiated the campaign to open New York City’s first airport. The airport is managed by the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, which has a nice slideshow of airport history.

KLGA has roughly 500 daily departures. Flights are limited by a ‘perimeter rule’, such that commercial destinations are all within 1,500 miles (though there are a few exceptions, such as Denver at ~1,600-miles) and there are no commercial flights to/from international destinations (other than eastern Canada). The airlines are pushing for an end to the perimeter rule, and if this happens, they will add more flights, including to the Delta/Northwest hub in Salt Lake City and to the West Coast.

Needless to say, the densely populated NYC area ensures this airport has a substantial impact on airport neighbors. That said, the impact is greatly magnified by FAA’s regulatory capture. The federal authority responsible for aviation in the U.S. is increasingly ‘collaborating’ behind closed doors with so-called ‘stakeholders’ to enable new routes, procedures and expansions, all designed to benefit the airlines, many times at great cost to other, non-stakeholders, such as airport neighbors. For example, although the basic NextGen technologies have been around a while, up until a few years ago, FAA was environmentally constrained from creating new impactful routes. It was not until early 2012 that FAA and the airlines got Congress to add ambiguous language that allows Categorical Exemptions (CATEXs). FAA is liberally applying the CATEX, creating routes in and out of KLGA with zero environmental review. The result is focused flight tracks, particularly the TNNIS departure, which are destroying neighborhoods in Flushing and elsewhere.