List of Amendments Submitted to House Rules Committee, for H.R. 2997

Noon on Monday was an important deadline, for the formal submission of amendments to the draft House legislation reauthorizing FAA. A flood of amendments were submitted, very many of them related to reigning in FAA’s abusive NextGen implementation. A list of 116 amendments, with summaries, was posted, and a PDF copy is archived here. One of the most important amendments was submitted by Representative Lynch (MA), calling for a National Academy of Medicine (NAM) “…expert consensus report that sets forth current scientific knowledge relating to the various health impacts of air traffic noise and pollution.” (this amendment was marked as #50, in the center column of the list).

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Cindy Christiansen deserves much of the credit for this, as she has done a great job researching and focusing on a much-needed study. Below is an excerpt from her letter to Rep. Lynch, earlier this month (view archived copy here): she lays out the NextGen impacts that FAA and airport authorities continue to ignore, and not just at Boston but across the land:

“…over the last several years, the FAA has implemented NextGen technology that replaces radar navigation with satellite-based navigation systems (GPS). Now and because of the new technology, concentrated flight paths that vary by less than a few feet vertically and laterally, increased airline operations, decreased separation, and lower altitudes have created a public health crisis in communities across the country. The new navigation system was implemented without any investigation into the human capacity to withstand the concentrated and relentless aviation noise and exposure to pollution, but the evidence is there, in the peer-reviewed literature, that there are significant detrimental effects on population health that are associated with these changes. We need a National Academy of Medicine committee of experts to synthesize the evidence and to report their consensus….”

As a side note, this is one of the rare ‘studies’ that has a chance to be very quickly produced, and with meaningful positive impact. Too often, and for decades now, FAA et al have used ‘more study’ as a delay tactic, to perpetuate changes that serve airlines/industry while impacting residents. This study is quite different, and essentially will soon force FAA to acknowledge the compiled content of dozens of studies they continue to ignore. Clearly, a NAM consensus report makes good sense, and will help us to break out of this stuck cycle.