Aviation growth ≠ Economic Growth

In the U.S., we have thousands of people being victimized by the diminished health and destroyed residential quality of life, under NextGen’s “pack’em tight and keep’em coming” automated flight routes. The airlines are getting richer and, this time of year, too many of us have to smell jetfuel if we dare to barbecue in the backyard.

If Canada was part of our NextGen program, Toronto (by far the busiest Canadian airport) would be their highest-impact area. Pearson Airport [CYYZ] is their biggest airline hub. One thing to understand, though, is NextGen is just a brandname, conspired by industry and FAA, and brandished all over the place to fool people into thinking it is something new. It is not. It is just a brandname. The real changes are happening worldwide, and are due to the widely homogenized digital systems that enable aircraft everywhere to be operated almost entirely using automation – both by pilots and air traffic control (ATC). Consequently, the impacts around Toronto are exactly like the impacts around Seattle, San Diego, Charlotte, Boston, and all the other major U.S. hubs: repetitive, low, slow and loud, often with turns incredibly close to the runway.

Here’s a letter to the editor worth archiving, from Toronto: (click here to view original)

Click on the image below for a scrollable view; the PDF file may be downloaded

Aviation growth ≠ Economic Growth

Aviation growth = Economic Growth – Community Impacts

Yup. The math is that simple. So long as costs are ignored, it looks like pure benefits, right?

People are talking about this one. Good letter.

One of the leading activists about NextGen sent me a note with her thoughts: 

“…I like the equations in that Toronto letter.
I don’t know if it is a conspiracy or negligence.  What they are doing now is the “benefit” part of a cost/benefit plan and analysis, completely ignoring all of the costs to individuals on the ground and communities.
The advertising, the spin, the propaganda, and the Pollyanna attempts to make it all seem good without also mentioning the negatives, the consequences, the price individuals and other industries, e.g. healthcare, pay for the airline industry’s proclaimed success is misleading.  It is hard to know if the twisted focus on the positive and the hiding of the negatives is conspiratorial or wishful thinking + ignorance….”

Same Technologies, Same Impacts … in Canada, too.

A tweet by T.A.N.G. (Toronto Aviation Noise Group), notes how an innocuous notice was made years ago, inviting residents to offer comments for proposed new flight routes. CYYZ.20160626cpy.. NAVCANADA 'innocuous ad inviting citizen comments on flight path change proposals' (attd to tweet by TANG)What the notice and other activities did NOT make clear was that the routes were being concentrated, so that selected areas would become inundated with repetitive aircraft noises, one flight after another … and these patterns can continue non-stop, even for weeks.

The same lame (and deceptive) strategy has been used repeatedly, at airports around the world, including in the U.S. Repeatedly, FAA and other ATC agencies are doing a shoddy job, failing to engage citizens while implementing substantial and impactful changes.

Below are two videos: one for Toronto, and another for the California Bay Area.  The first video is by T.A.N.G., and the second was posted by Stanford Journalism. Nearly identical impacts, created by the same pattern: federal agencies abusing their authority to accommodate industry profit while creating a real environmental cost.