Is FAA Failing in Their Safety Oversight of Allegiant Air?

On May 11th this year, we were deeply embroiled in the election primaries, with growing evidence that the U.S. election system is in a flat-line failure mode. So, it is not surprising that the 20-year anniversary of the ValuJet crash in the Everglades might have gone unnoticed, at least by some of us.

The crash took 110 lives, and deeply scarred thousands more. The investigation of the crash exposed cultural failures at FAA, and led DoT Inspector General Mary Schiavo to abruptly resign in July of that year (she was THAT disgusted with the inside politics and cover-up, not just by FAA but by the White House, too). The crash and victims were recalled in a Miami Herald article. Subsequent news articles this year have looked at Allegiant Air, noting its many connections back to ValuJet, and presenting evidence that FAA is AGAIN being lax in safety oversight.

Below is a recent news article, critical of both Allegiant and FAA. In the pages that follow, aiREFORM provides an archived collection of articles and other documents related to Allegiant Air. The records are presented in chronological order on the following pages, mostly as scrollable PDF files.

Click on the image below for a scrollable view; the PDF file may be downloaded.

Florida Airports are Particularly Vulnerable to Sea Level Rise

If there is one U.S. state whose airports are most vulnerable to climate change, it is Florida, where many significant airports are at very low elevation. The busiest Florida airport, KMIA in Miami, is at 9-feet elevation. The state’s fifth-busiest airport, KFLL in Fort Lauderdale,**The airport at Fort Lauderdale is undergoing an $800 Million project to expand one of the runways. The design includes elevating the runway, with bridges over where the extended runway crosses railroad tracks and a major highway (US Highway 1). This may be the first of many necessary and very expensive projects to elevate Florida runways. It seems doubtful that our economy will remain capable of funding such large aviation projects in another decade or two. is also at just 9-feet elevation. The state’s sixth-busiest airport, KTMB to the southwest of Miami, sits at just 10-feet elevation.

As atmospheric CO2 continues to climb, it is expected that the massive amounts of ice on Greenland and Antarctica will continue to melt. The rates of melting in the past decade have increased substantially, and some now believe that we have passed a tipping point — that the meltoff is irreversible. If so, sea levels around the world are expected to rise by dozens of feet. Of course, how quickly the sea levels rise depends on how quickly the ice melts or slides off into the adjacent seas.

Considering the vulnerability of Florida aviation to climate change sea-level rise, it is shocking to see the diversity of reactions by Floridians. On the one extreme, Senator Marco Rubio is in full denial. Yet, on the other extreme, a major Christian group is bucking the conservative trend and speaking of how we have a moral and religious obligation to protect our environment:

“…Climate change just isn’t in faraway places. Florida, your home, literally represents “ground zero.” Sea level rise, more extreme weather, saltwater contaminated wells, loss of farm land and increased air pollution all pose significant threats to the health and well-being of Floridians. Unfortunately, a few in our nation are attempting to portray addressing climate change as a liberal issue. It’s not. It’s a moral challenge to all Americans. It is a call to follow our Risen Lord and act to prepare for the impacts, many of which are already happening, and to work to reduce our carbon pollution to help our children, now and in the future….”

One other area of the U.S. that is especially vulnerable: New York City. The three busiest airports there all average more than 1,000 operations per day and include: KEWR in Newark at 10-feet elevation, KJFK (Kennedy) in New York in Jamaica at 12-feet elevation, and KLGA (LaGuardia) at 12-feet elevation (and with one runway end at just 7-feet elevation).


Links to three recent articles:

 

Is Arctic ice melting faster than expected?

There was a news article late last month, discussing the rapid decline of Arctic Sea ice. I researched a bit further and found the charts and interpretations at the National Snow & Ice Data Center. It all indicates Arctic ice is melting faster than was expected. Of course, a great fear related to polar ice melting is that, based on the enormous amount of ice at the Earth’s poles and on Greenland, this rapid melting may raise the world’s oceans by 20-25′.

Arctic lowest ice extent hit a record low in September, and reduced to just a fraction more than 50% of the average minimal ice extent for the years 1979-2000. The ice is also thinning.

I then looked at some airport data and realized, we have a bunch of major US airports at risk of being flooded, because they sit on flat land close to sea level. These are all around or below 20′ mean sea level (MSL). I put together a quick list:

  • The three major airports in the New York area are;
    • Kennedy Airport [KJFK], at 14ft MSL
    • Newark Airport [KEWR], at 18ft MSL
    • and LaGuardia Airport [KLGA], at 21ft MSL
    • note also, Boston’s major airport [KBOS] is at 20ft MSL, while Washington’s Reagan National Airport [KDCA] is at 15ft MSL.
  • On the West Coast, San Diego [KSAN] is at 13ft MSL, while San Francisco [KSFO] is at 17ft MSL, and Oakland [KOAK] is at 9ft MSL. If commercial aviation is to continue to grow, San Jose [KSJC] will feel pressure to expand its operations.
  • In the southern U.S., Miami International [KMIA] is 8ft MSL, while Fort Lauderdale [KFLL] is at 9ft MSL, and both are on FAA’s short list of 35 OEP Airports. New Orleans is still recovering from Katrina, but its two airports ([KMSY] & [KNEW]) are at 7ft and 4ft MSL.
  • Vacation flying to Hawaii will be impacted; the Honolulu Airport [PHNL] is at 13ft MSL.

The takeaway may be this: if we do not get serious about managing and minimizing the rate of carbon consumption, we will see a time come soon when the environment is biting back, not just flooding low Pacific islands, but also taking away key parts of our aviation infrastructure.